Cacao / Tablea

The Philippine tablea is defined as roasted, ground and molded nibs of fermented pure (100%) cacao beans without added ingredients and additives. It is also a cocoa mass and cocoa liquor made from cacao beans that are fermented, dried, roasted, ground then molded into blocks, balls, discs, or tablets.

It is traditionally used in the Philippines to make a hot chocolate beverage using a wooden mixing implement or stirrer. The Cacao Industry Development Association of Mindanao estimated that around 2,000 tons of cacao beans is processed to tablea.

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About Cacao / Tablea

The industry is composed mostly of smallholder farmers who supply dry cacao beans to the processors/manufacturers. Manufacturers are mostly small to medium scale enterprises. Some of the larger players are also into cocoa powder and cocoa butter.

The country exports and imports cocoa and cocoa products which includes chocolate confectionery containing cocoa in various forms and sizes, other food preparations containing cocoa in various forms and sizes, other than chocolate confectionery containing cocoa in various forms and sizes, and other than chocolate confectionery containing cocoa in tablets or pastilles. Total imports of cocoa and cocoa products in 2012 amounted to 3,662 tons, with CIF value of almost US$ 12 million. On the other hand, total exports in 2012 is 512 tons, with a total FOB value of US$ 1.8 million.

The market opportunities for tablea and cocoa products is growing, as there is an increasing number of cafes and restaurants offering chocolate drinks. Moreover, the trend towards wellness and a healthy lifestyle is seen as another opportunity for cocoa, as it is being positioned and marketed as a health food given its natural contents and health benefits. It is projected that by 2020, there is an additional one million tons of cacao needed to meet global demand, while an additional 30,000 tons are needed to meet local demand. As such, cacao growers and cocoa manufacturers in the country are well-positioned to translate these market opportunities into a profitable reality.

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Facts and Figures

Imports of Cocoa and Cocoa Preparations (‘000 kgs.)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Cocoa beans, whole or broken, raw or roasted                143                  123                738                307                150                223
Cocoa shells, husks, skins and waste            2,047            2,151            2,032            1,753            1,969            2,633
Cocoa paste            5,889            6,080            5,434            4,522                640                579
Cocoa powder, unsweetened          12,615          13,284          15,024          13,872          11,120          13,340
Chocolate and other foods containing cocoa          13,285          11,645          12,453          12,711          13,939          16,655

Source: United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database

 

Exports of Cocoa and Cocoa Preparations (‘000 kgs.)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Cocoa beans, whole or broken, raw or roasted                107                299                196                127                440                554
Cocoa shells, husks, skins and waste                            –                  20                            –                            –                            –                            –
Cocoa paste                            –                121                  41                265                245                138
Cocoa powder, unsweetened                  74                313                663                812                  21                  15
Chocolate and other foods containing cocoa                827                784                863                786            1,028            3,002

Source: United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database

03

Policies

IPP 2014-2016

The production of cacao as a commercial production activity is among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. All projects must be endorsed by the Department of Agriculture (DA).

The manufacture of tablea as a commercial processing activity can be considered among the preferred activities listed in the IPP. Commercial processing covers the (1) extraction of higher value substances from agricultural and fishery raw materials through bioprocessing; or (2) conversion of agricultural and fishery products or wastes to a form ready for further processing or final consumption.

Commercial processing of agricultural products should involve the use of domestically-produced raw or semi-processed agricultural products, unless these inputs are not locally available (NLP) or are not in sufficient quantity (NISQ).

If using imported raw or semi-processed agricultural products that are locally-produced (LP) or in sufficient quantity (ISQ), the project may qualify for registration, provided that the finished/final product is for export, or the project qualifies for pioneer status.

BPS Product Certification Scheme

The certification of cocoa products is guided by the Philippine Standard (PS) Quality and/or Safety Certification Mark Scheme.

PNS for Cocoa Products

There is a Philippine National Standard covering  cocoa beans, Philippine tablea, and code of agricultural practices for cacao beans and Philippine tablea and Philippine cacao beans.

04

Programs

Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project

The Shared Service Facilities (SSF) Project is a major component of the MSME Development (MSMED) Program of the DTI and aims to improve the productivity and competitiveness of MSMEs by providing them with machinery, equipment, tools, systems, skills, and knowledge under a shared system.

The SSF Project seeks to address processing and manufacturing gaps and bottlenecks in the value chain of priority industry clusters, particularly those in agribusiness.

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Champions

No champions found.